+8801624-350002
international@uiec.study
Open hours: 10:00 AM - 6:30 PM
Today: Oct. 15, 2021
EMAIL
international@uiec.study
HOTLINE
+8801614-350002
Open hours: 10:00 AM - 6:30 PM

Study in NZ

STUDY IN NEW ZEALAND

STUDY IN NEW ZEALAND

?? Study in New Zealand! IELTS: 5.5-6.5 Overall
? ??Study in Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology, NZ!
? Apply ? Admission & Scholarships ✈️Get Visa
?Call 01645024121/ 01974350006 for information
• Tuition fee (After visa approval) : NZ$19,000- NZ$35,000
• Bank Sponsor: 25-30 Lac BDT
• Courses: Diplomaa, Bachelor, Masters

WHY CHOOSE HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE NEW ZEALAND?

Study in New Zealand

New Zealand is a unique country, with gorgeous scenery and excellent study opportunities. It’s a safe and welcoming community with a world-class reputation for cutting-edge research and creative energy. These elements make the country an attractive destination for international students.

Why Study in New Zealand?

New Zealand has several types of higher education institutions: universities, colleges, private institutions and polytechnics. There are 8 universities in New Zealand, which all offer high quality education. All 8 of these universities are ranked within the QS World University Ranking top 500. The highest ranked is the University of Auckland, which is in 82nd place, followed by the University of Otago in 151st place.

One great advantage to studying in New Zealand is the unique approach to education. Students are encouraged to think as an individual and find their own solutions, which is how many develop unique strengths and ideas whilst studying in the country.

You are able to study in New Zealand at all of the traditional levels; undergraduate (bachelor’s), postgraduate (master’s) and doctoral (PhD). There are options to gain specific qualifications, such as Graduate Diplomas and Honours. These types of study generally last one year.

QUICK FACTS

Universities, Institutes of Technology/Polytechnics, and Wānanga

  • New Zealand has eight universities that offer academic programmes, rather than vocational.All New Zealand’s universities offer a broad range of subjects for undergraduate, Masters and Doctoral (PhD) degrees in commerce, science and the humanities. Some universities offer degrees in specialist fields – such as medicine, agriculture, engineering, etc. A number of universities have more than one campus, often located in different cities, and some have overseas programmes.New Zealand also has 18 Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs). They provide professional and vocational education and training ranging from introductory studies through to full degree programmes. Many ITPs also offer English language training and postgraduate study options, including up to Doctoral (PhD) level. Courses are more vocationally oriented, emphasising practical experience and application to work situations. A degree from one of these institutions has equal status with a university degree.There are three Wānanga in Aotearoa New Zealand. These tertiary institutions offer teaching and learning environments that are based on Māori values and principles. Many offer qualifications in te reo Māori (Māori language), teaching, nursing, business, health, English language and Māori arts. Wānanga offer many undergraduate and postgraduate programmes, including master’s and doctoral (PhD) level qualifications.

Private Training Institutions and English language schools

You also have the choice of 600 registered Private Training Establishments (PTEs). PTE courses are generally specific to English language learning or niche occupations such as travel and tourism, design and ICT.

Most PTEs provide certificate and diploma level qualifications, but some also deliver Bachelor and Masters degrees. They also normally have flexible start dates throughout the year.

Many international students enrol in English for Academic Study courses prior to formal academic studies. Special English language courses are available throughout the year, and range from four weeks to 12 months.

Students who are competent in English often do short-term foundation studies or pre-university orientation studies at PTEs or universities.

Admission requirements

  • To study for diplomas and degrees at Universities, Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics, students coming through New Zealand’s secondary school system generally need NCEA Level 3 qualifications.Students from overseas need to be able to show they’ve achieved a similar University entrance level of education – that can include GCSE A levels for students from the UK, Hong Kong ‘A’ Levels, STPM /Malaysian Higher School Certificate Australian Matriculation Year 12 Certificate. They also need to be able to prove their English skills.The Universities New Zealand website has more information about the admission requirements for students with overseas qualifications.Domestic students over 20 don’t need formal qualifications to apply for entry.Students can also do short-term foundation studies or pre-university orientation studies at PTEs or universities to prepare for university-level study. You need to check with the tertiary education provider you’re considering.

Applying

Once you’ve found the institution and course you want, you’ll need to complete and return the relevant paperwork. Once accepted, the institution will send you an ‘offer of place’ letter and once you’ve paid the fees, the institution will send you a ‘confirmed offer of place’.

If your course is for less than 12 weeks, or your country has a visa-free agreement with New Zealand, you don’t need a visa.

In all other cases you’ll need to apply for a New Zealand student visa and be able to show the confirmed offer.

International Students – For more detailed information on courses, institutions and applying, visit Education New Zealand’s Study in New Zealand website.

For information specifically on doctoral studies, visit their section on post graduate study. 

Study in New Zealand | Education NZ

Fees and allowances

Students with ‘domestic’ status have their fees subsidised by the government, although they’re expected to contribute about 30% of the cost of their course. That applies to New Zealand citizens and holders of residents’ visas. There are some other categories of people eligible for domestic status – check the Ministry of Education website for more information.

Other students can access tertiary education in New Zealand but they pay international fees.

Fees can vary widely depending on the course and the institution, so check the websites of the institutions you’re considering.

In some cases, you might be eligible for the government’s fees free scheme – check their website.

Definition of domestic student | Ministry of Education

Fees Free website | Tertiary Education Commission

Student loans, allowances and the fees free policy

Citizens and residents must be resident in New Zealand for at least three years before they are eligible to apply for any of these:

  • a student allowance, which will help with living costs
  • a student loan to help pay for fees and course-related costs
  • the fees free policy.

Loans need to be repaid, but allowances don’t.

Check the Study link website for information about loans and allowances, including eligibility.

Studylink | Ministry of Social Development

Residency criteria | Study Link

Encouraging creativity

New Zealand is a young country where independence, initiative and resourcefulness are more highly regarded than status or rules. As a student here you’ll be encouraged to be questioning, flexible and to seek your own answers by thinking for yourself. Learning here rewards inventiveness and creativity.

About New Zealand

New Zealand is an island country located in the Pacific Ocean. The country mainly comprises of two islands. These are the North Island and South Island, although there are numerous smaller islands. The closest countries to New Zealand are Australia and the Pacific island nations: Fiji, New Caledonia and Tonga.

Made internationally famous through the Lord of the Rings film series, the beautiful scenery of New Zealand is varied thanks to ancient volcanic eruptions. New Zealand offers a rich mix of various cultures, including Maori, Pakeha (people of European descent), Asian and Pacific populations.

It is a developed country and does well in national performance rankings. These rankings consider all aspects, including quality of life, health, education and economic freedom. The most dominant sector of the national economy is the service sector, followed by the industrial sector.

The top tourist attractions in New Zealand include:

  • Coromandel Peninsula
  • Abel Tasman National Park
  • Sky Tower (Auckland)
  • Napier Art Deco
  • Kaikoura

Cost of Studying & Living in New Zealand

New Zealand uses the New Zealand Dollar ($NZD) as their currency.

Institutions in New Zealand are permitted to set their own tuition fees. This means that what you pay will be different depending on your institution of choice. International students can expect to pay between $22,000 and $32,000 for a bachelor’s degree, and between $26,000 and $37,000 for a postgraduate course. However, if you choose a course such as medicine, engineering or veterinary science, your fees are likely to be higher. All PhD students pay the same, which is $6,500 to $9,000 per year. For information about the cost of your specific course, contact your institution.

There are scholarships available for international students at all levels, including students wanting to gain a PhD. These scholarships are offered by the institutions themselves, or the government. Contact your institution to get more information about your eligibility, or use the official New Zealand scholarship directory.

Living costs depend on where you choose to live in New Zealand. As in most countries, the bigger cities will require a larger living budget than the smaller cities and towns. It is recommended that you allow between $15,000-$27,000 per year. If you will be studying in New Zealand for more than one year, you will be required to prove that you have at least $15,000 to support yourself for the first year. If you are studying for up to a year, you are required to prove that you have at least $1,250 for each month of study.

If you have a student visa, you are able to work up to 20 hours per week during term time, and full time out of term time. Students completing Masters by Research or PhD are able to work full time throughout their studies, including term time.

In order to study in New Zealand, you might have to purchase health insurance. This will depend on where you are from. If you hold a student visa, you are not eligible for publicly funded health services. The exception to this rule are students from Australia and the United Kingdom or PhD students. These students are entitled to publicly funded health care for immediately necessary treatment only. If you are from any other country, or need to access further medical treatment, you will need to make sure that you have valid medical and travel insurance throughout your stay. Your chosen institution will be able to provide more information regarding this.

Visas

If you will be staying in New Zealand for more than 3 months, you may need to apply for a student visa. Students from Australia or other countries that have an agreement with New Zealand do not need to apply for a visa.

Once you have your visa, you can stay in the country for up to four years and have permission to work up to 20 hours per week. You must be enrolled with an approved institution and have the money to pay for your course.

You can either apply for your visa at your home country’s New Zealand embassy or consulate, but the application fee is 10% cheaper online.
For more information about visas, please visit the New Zealand Immigration website.

Language

There are three official languages in New Zealand; English, Maori and New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL). Te Reo Maori became an official language in 1987. NZSL, the main language of the deaf community in New Zealand, became an official language in 2006.

With only 3.7% of the population speaking Maori, the language is in danger of extinction. Authorities are working to make sure this doesn’t happen, implementing Maori classes in schools, as well as television channels broadcasting exclusively in Maori. Studying in New Zealand would be a fantastic opportunity to immerse yourself in a historic culture, picking up some Maori language and NZSL.

The majority of courses are offered in English. If your native language is not English, you may have to prove that your English skills will meet the teaching standards. If you do not, it is common for institutions to offer language programmes to improve your skills. Contact your institution if you want more information about this.